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We Live As We Dream: Alone

We Live As We Dream: Alone

In 1993, forty-eight years after the end of the Second World War, Nick Waplington photographed drawings and inscriptions left by German prisoners of war on the walls of the Island Farm camp in South Wales. Island Farm's inmates included high-ranking SS officers, some of whom would be tried at Nuremberg at the end of the war. Waplington's treatment of the graffiti divorces them from their particular historical moment, evoking cave painting or dilapidated frescos, although some of the subject matter - such as a guard dispensing porridge - hints at the context in which they were made. The series title is taken from Joseph Conrad's novel Heart of Darkness, and is a character's lament for the impossibility of communicating one's own experience. Presumably the prisoners created these images for themselves alone, as sources of solace, whether nostalgic, patriotic, romantic or defiant. Most of the camp was demolished in 1994.

For more info and interviews visit Tate

Installation shots courtesy of Tate Modern

We Live As We Dream: Alone

We Live As We Dream: Alone

In 1993, forty-eight years after the end of the Second World War, Nick Waplington photographed drawings and inscriptions left by German prisoners of war on the walls of the Island Farm camp in South Wales. Island Farm's inmates included high-ranking SS officers, some of whom would be tried at Nuremberg at the end of the war. Waplington's treatment of the graffiti divorces them from their particular historical moment, evoking cave painting or dilapidated frescos, although some of the subject matter - such as a guard dispensing porridge - hints at the context in which they were made. The series title is taken from Joseph Conrad's novel Heart of Darkness, and is a character's lament for the impossibility of communicating one's own experience. Presumably the prisoners created these images for themselves alone, as sources of solace, whether nostalgic, patriotic, romantic or defiant. Most of the camp was demolished in 1994.

For more info and interviews visit Tate

Installation shots courtesy of Tate Modern

We Live As We Dream: Alone

We Live As We Dream: Alone

In 1993, forty-eight years after the end of the Second World War, Nick Waplington photographed drawings and inscriptions left by German prisoners of war on the walls of the Island Farm camp in South Wales. Island Farm's inmates included high-ranking SS officers, some of whom would be tried at Nuremberg at the end of the war. Waplington's treatment of the graffiti divorces them from their particular historical moment, evoking cave painting or dilapidated frescos, although some of the subject matter - such as a guard dispensing porridge - hints at the context in which they were made. The series title is taken from Joseph Conrad's novel Heart of Darkness, and is a character's lament for the impossibility of communicating one's own experience. Presumably the prisoners created these images for themselves alone, as sources of solace, whether nostalgic, patriotic, romantic or defiant. Most of the camp was demolished in 1994.

For more info and interviews visit Tate

Installation shots courtesy of Tate Modern

We Live As We Dream: Alone

We Live As We Dream: Alone

In 1993, forty-eight years after the end of the Second World War, Nick Waplington photographed drawings and inscriptions left by German prisoners of war on the walls of the Island Farm camp in South Wales. Island Farm's inmates included high-ranking SS officers, some of whom would be tried at Nuremberg at the end of the war. Waplington's treatment of the graffiti divorces them from their particular historical moment, evoking cave painting or dilapidated frescos, although some of the subject matter - such as a guard dispensing porridge - hints at the context in which they were made. The series title is taken from Joseph Conrad's novel Heart of Darkness, and is a character's lament for the impossibility of communicating one's own experience. Presumably the prisoners created these images for themselves alone, as sources of solace, whether nostalgic, patriotic, romantic or defiant. Most of the camp was demolished in 1994.

For more info and interviews visit Tate

Installation shots courtesy of Tate Modern

We Live As We Dream: Alone

In 1993, forty-eight years after the end of the Second World War, Nick Waplington photographed drawings and inscriptions left by German prisoners of war on the walls of the Island Farm camp in South Wales. Island Farm's inmates included high-ranking SS officers, some of whom would be tried at Nuremberg at the end of the war. Waplington's treatment of the graffiti divorces them from their particular historical moment, evoking cave painting or dilapidated frescos, although some of the subject matter - such as a guard dispensing porridge - hints at the context in which they were made. The series title is taken from Joseph Conrad's novel Heart of Darkness, and is a character's lament for the impossibility of communicating one's own experience. Presumably the prisoners created these images for themselves alone, as sources of solace, whether nostalgic, patriotic, romantic or defiant. Most of the camp was demolished in 1994.

For more info and interviews visit Tate

Installation shots courtesy of Tate Modern

We Live As We Dream: Alone

In 1993, forty-eight years after the end of the Second World War, Nick Waplington photographed drawings and inscriptions left by German prisoners of war on the walls of the Island Farm camp in South Wales. Island Farm's inmates included high-ranking SS officers, some of whom would be tried at Nuremberg at the end of the war. Waplington's treatment of the graffiti divorces them from their particular historical moment, evoking cave painting or dilapidated frescos, although some of the subject matter - such as a guard dispensing porridge - hints at the context in which they were made. The series title is taken from Joseph Conrad's novel Heart of Darkness, and is a character's lament for the impossibility of communicating one's own experience. Presumably the prisoners created these images for themselves alone, as sources of solace, whether nostalgic, patriotic, romantic or defiant. Most of the camp was demolished in 1994.

For more info and interviews visit Tate

Installation shots courtesy of Tate Modern

We Live As We Dream: Alone

In 1993, forty-eight years after the end of the Second World War, Nick Waplington photographed drawings and inscriptions left by German prisoners of war on the walls of the Island Farm camp in South Wales. Island Farm's inmates included high-ranking SS officers, some of whom would be tried at Nuremberg at the end of the war. Waplington's treatment of the graffiti divorces them from their particular historical moment, evoking cave painting or dilapidated frescos, although some of the subject matter - such as a guard dispensing porridge - hints at the context in which they were made. The series title is taken from Joseph Conrad's novel Heart of Darkness, and is a character's lament for the impossibility of communicating one's own experience. Presumably the prisoners created these images for themselves alone, as sources of solace, whether nostalgic, patriotic, romantic or defiant. Most of the camp was demolished in 1994.

For more info and interviews visit Tate

Installation shots courtesy of Tate Modern

We Live As We Dream: Alone

In 1993, forty-eight years after the end of the Second World War, Nick Waplington photographed drawings and inscriptions left by German prisoners of war on the walls of the Island Farm camp in South Wales. Island Farm's inmates included high-ranking SS officers, some of whom would be tried at Nuremberg at the end of the war. Waplington's treatment of the graffiti divorces them from their particular historical moment, evoking cave painting or dilapidated frescos, although some of the subject matter - such as a guard dispensing porridge - hints at the context in which they were made. The series title is taken from Joseph Conrad's novel Heart of Darkness, and is a character's lament for the impossibility of communicating one's own experience. Presumably the prisoners created these images for themselves alone, as sources of solace, whether nostalgic, patriotic, romantic or defiant. Most of the camp was demolished in 1994.

For more info and interviews visit Tate

Installation shots courtesy of Tate Modern

We Live As We Dream: Alone
We Live As We Dream: Alone
We Live As We Dream: Alone
We Live As We Dream: Alone